NEWS AND UPDATES

NEWS AND UPDATES

Single-pilot passenger planes could soon take to the skies, says Boeing

Plane maker Boeing is actively working on technology that would remove the need for two pilots in the cockpits of its passenger jets.

Existing European aviation rules state that passenger planes with more than 19 seats must have a minimum of two pilots in the cockpit.

But Steve Nordlund, a vice president at Boeing, said autonomous technology that would allow for a reduction in on-board crew was being developed at a “good speed”.

He said Boeing “believes in autonomous flight and self-piloted aircraft” and the firm’s commercial aircraft division was “working on those technologies today”.

“I don’t think you’ll see a pilotless aircraft of a 737 in the near future,” he told The Independent.

“But what you may see is more automation and aiding in the cockpit, maybe a change in the crew number up in the cockpit.”

He suggested cargo jets could be the first to trial the technology but that it made “business sense” to pursue a reduction in the number of on-board crew on passenger planes, too.

“A combination of safety, economics and technology all have to converge, and I think we are starting to see that.”

It would also address a chronic shortage of pilots which analysts have said could reach more than 200,000 over the next decade.

But while planes have become increasingly automated in recent decades, with autopilot routinely used throughout all phases of a flight, the prospect of fewer crew members may still prove to be a hard sell – both to passengers and regulators.

After a Germanwings pilot flew an A320 plane into the French Alps in March 2015, killing all 150 people on board, Europe’s aviation safety authority, EASA, imposed a rule that two crew members should be in the cockpit at all times. It meant that if a pilot needed to step out of the cockpit, to use the toilet for example, a member of the cabin crew had to step in.

EASA relaxed the requirement last year, saying it was up to airlines to ensure their aircraft were safe.

Sully Sullenberger, the retired US Airways pilot who saved the lives of 155 people when he landed an A320 on New York’s Hudson River after both engines suffered a bird strike, has previously spoken out against moves towards single-pilot aircraft. 

After the US Federal Aviation Administration asked Congress for money to research single-pilot commercial airliners, he said: “Having only one pilot in any commercial aircraft flies in the face of evidence and logic.

“Every safety protocol we have is predicated on having two pilots work seamlessly together as an expert team cross-checking and backing each other up.”

Mr Nordlund, who heads the firm’s innovation arm, Boeing NeXt, insisted single-pilot crews would only be deployed if there was appetite for it from airlines. 

He said developments would be driven by the “comfort levels of the consumer”, suggesting passenger concerns about safety – whether well-founded or not – could delay the roll-out of autonomous technology.

But he added: “When it is cargo, that aspect is taken out of the equation.”

Plane maker Boeing is actively working on technology that would remove the need for two pilots in the cockpits of its passenger jets.

Existing European aviation rules state that passenger planes with more than 19 seats must have a minimum of two pilots in the cockpit.

But Steve Nordlund, a vice president at Boeing, said autonomous technology that would allow for a reduction in on-board crew was being developed at a “good speed”.

He said Boeing “believes in autonomous flight and self-piloted aircraft” and the firm’s commercial aircraft division was “working on those technologies today”.

“I don’t think you’ll see a pilotless aircraft of a 737 in the near future,” he told The Independent.

“But what you may see is more automation and aiding in the cockpit, maybe a change in the crew number up in the cockpit.”

He suggested cargo jets could be the first to trial the technology but that it made “business sense” to pursue a reduction in the number of on-board crew on passenger planes, too.

“A combination of safety, economics and technology all have to converge, and I think we are starting to see that.”

It would also address a chronic shortage of pilots which analysts have said could reach more than 200,000 over the next decade.

But while planes have become increasingly automated in recent decades, with autopilot routinely used throughout all phases of a flight, the prospect of fewer crew members may still prove to be a hard sell – both to passengers and regulators.

After a Germanwings pilot flew an A320 plane into the French Alps in March 2015, killing all 150 people on board, Europe’s aviation safety authority, EASA, imposed a rule that two crew members should be in the cockpit at all times. It meant that if a pilot needed to step out of the cockpit, to use the toilet for example, a member of the cabin crew had to step in.

EASA relaxed the requirement last year, saying it was up to airlines to ensure their aircraft were safe.

Sully Sullenberger, the retired US Airways pilot who saved the lives of 155 people when he landed an A320 on New York’s Hudson River after both engines suffered a bird strike, has previously spoken out against moves towards single-pilot aircraft. 

After the US Federal Aviation Administration asked Congress for money to research single-pilot commercial airliners, he said: “Having only one pilot in any commercial aircraft flies in the face of evidence and logic.

“Every safety protocol we have is predicated on having two pilots work seamlessly together as an expert team cross-checking and backing each other up.”

Mr Nordlund, who heads the firm’s innovation arm, Boeing NeXt, insisted single-pilot crews would only be deployed if there was appetite for it from airlines. 

He said developments would be driven by the “comfort levels of the consumer”, suggesting passenger concerns about safety – whether well-founded or not – could delay the roll-out of autonomous technology.

But he added: “When it is cargo, that aspect is taken out of the equation.”

Singapore Airlines Takes Off for the World’s Longest Flight

Singapore Airlines have launched the world’s longest nonstop passenger flight from Singapore to New York this week.

The 10,400-mile flight, that will take up to 19 hours, will be flown by a long-range Airbus A350-900 aircraft with all premium seating. 

Singapore Airlines reclaimed its bragging rights as operator of the world’s longest flight last week as it relaunched nonstop service between Singapore and Newark Liberty International Airport near New York City. 

Singapore Airlines previously held the crown with the same route until 2013, when it was canceled. Now, with new Airbus A350s in its fleet, Singapore is back on the route. It launched the service Thursday with the first flight from Singapore.

On Friday, the inaugural nonstop departure for Singapore left from Newark. The aircraft and its 161 passengers completed the 9,535-mile route about an hour quicker than its 18-hour, 30-minute scheduled time. 

Now that it’s back, the new Singapore-Newark flight shaves hours off most of the current connecting options for flights between Singapore and the New York City area.

It’s a welcome change for regulars of the route like Bill Rosenthal, a publishing executive from New York City. Rosenthal began flying the route back in 2006 during Singapore Airlines’ previous run on the route that ended in 2013. Rosenthal says he’s lost count of how many times he’s done it, but he estimates he averages three to four visits per year.

When Singapore discontinued the route, he went back to Singapore’s longer, one-stop option that goes via Frankfurt, Germany.

“It’s so much easier to get on the plane in New York, sit for a really long time, and then walk off the plane in Singapore,” he said as the flight ticked into its 14th hour somewhere over Chengdu, China. “I’ll go right back to taking this flight on a regular basis,” he added.

Singapore Airlines have launched the world’s longest nonstop passenger flight from Singapore to New York this week.

The 10,400-mile flight, that will take up to 19 hours, will be flown by a long-range Airbus A350-900 aircraft with all premium seating. 

Singapore Airlines reclaimed its bragging rights as operator of the world’s longest flight last week as it relaunched nonstop service between Singapore and Newark Liberty International Airport near New York City. 

Singapore Airlines previously held the crown with the same route until 2013, when it was canceled. Now, with new Airbus A350s in its fleet, Singapore is back on the route. It launched the service Thursday with the first flight from Singapore.

On Friday, the inaugural nonstop departure for Singapore left from Newark. The aircraft and its 161 passengers completed the 9,535-mile route about an hour quicker than its 18-hour, 30-minute scheduled time. 

Now that it’s back, the new Singapore-Newark flight shaves hours off most of the current connecting options for flights between Singapore and the New York City area.

It’s a welcome change for regulars of the route like Bill Rosenthal, a publishing executive from New York City. Rosenthal began flying the route back in 2006 during Singapore Airlines’ previous run on the route that ended in 2013. Rosenthal says he’s lost count of how many times he’s done it, but he estimates he averages three to four visits per year.

When Singapore discontinued the route, he went back to Singapore’s longer, one-stop option that goes via Frankfurt, Germany.

“It’s so much easier to get on the plane in New York, sit for a really long time, and then walk off the plane in Singapore,” he said as the flight ticked into its 14th hour somewhere over Chengdu, China. “I’ll go right back to taking this flight on a regular basis,” he added.

Remembering Amelia Earhart for More than Her Disappearance

With the riddle of her last flight now seemingly solved, attention may focus on how the pioneer pilot defied ‘the inheritance of age-old customs that women are bred to timidity’

In 1960 an old US coastguard told a curious reporter a tale he had heard some 14 years before on the Pacific island of Nikumaroro.

Not long after the island was first settled in 1938, said Floyd Kilts, a local man was walking by the shore: “There in the brush about 5ft feet from the shoreline he saw a skeleton. What attracted him to it were the shoes. Women’s shoes, American kind…”

Was this, the old coastguard wondered, the key to what really happened to Amelia Earhart 

, the aviation pioneer who had disappeared in 1937 while attempting to become the first woman to fly around the world?
Even in 1960, the mystery was assuming mythical proportions.

Some were suggesting that Earhart had actually been on a secret spying mission for US President Franklin Roosevelt; that she had survived and returned to the US to live under a false identity. 

In time, there would be speculation that Earhart had been captured by the Japanese, sometimes with the embellishment that she had been forced to become the voice of “Tokyo Rose”, taunting US servicemen with propaganda broadcasts during the Second World War.

The official US government position remained that Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan had crashed into the Pacific Ocean and died at sea while trying to reach Howland Island.

Now Kilts was suggesting the pair had died as castaways on what had then been an uninhabited, waterless Pacific atoll some 350 miles from their intended destination.

She may have enjoyed being named by the Fashion Designers of America as one of the 10 best dressed women in the US in 1934, but from the start Earhart delighted in defying the expectations placed on young women.

As a child, she climbed trees, hunted rats with a .22 rifle and kept a scrapbook of newspaper cuttings about accomplished women.

She took a car mechanics course, and when aged 23, she was first taken up in a plane, as a passenger on a 10-minute air show joy ride in 1920: “As soon as I left the ground, I knew I myself had to fly.”

She paid for her flying lessons with jobs that included being a truck driver.

Shortly after completing her first solo flight in 1921, Earhart bought a second-hand Kinner Airster biplane, painted it bright yellow and nicknamed it “the Canary”.

The next year she flew the Canary up to 14,000 feet, the world altitude record at the time for female pilots. 

Then in 1923 she got her pilot’s licence from the Federation Aeronautique, the world governing body for aeronautics. She was the 16th woman in the world to have such a pilot’s licence.

It was during her spell as a social worker helping poor immigrants in a “settlement house” in Boston in 1928 that Earhart was asked if she wanted to join an expedition that would make her the first woman to fly across the Atlantic.

She leapt at the chance – even though, on the 20 hour, 40 minute flight from Newfoundland to Wales with Wilmer Stultz and Lou Gordon she was not herself able to take the controls of the Fokker FVII aeroplane.

The flight, however, gave her a first taste of international fame, and bought her into contact with the publicist George P. Putnam, (GPP), who became her manager and – eventually – her husband. He proposed six times before she said yes.

And on the morning of 7 February 1931, their wedding day, she sent him a letter.

“Dear GPP,” she told him, “There are some things which should be writ before we are married.

“You must know again my reluctance to marry, my feeling that I shatter thereby chances in work which means most to me.

“Please let us not interfere with the others’ work or play … I cannot guarantee to endure at all times the confinements of even an attractive cage.”

Fifteen months after her wedding, On 21 May 1932, she became the first woman to complete a solo, non-stop flight across the Atlantic.

Four hours into her 2,026-mile flight, Earhart revealed, “I saw flames shooting from the exhaust pipe.”

“I became uneasy,” she admitted.  “It would have taken four hours to return, however, so I thought it would be safer to go ahead.”

Then she realised the fuel tank of her Lockheed Vega 5B monoplane was leaking.

She flew on, with the exhaust manifold of her engine burned out and only tomato juice to keep her own energy levels up.

Fourteen hours and 56 minutes after leaving Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, she said, “After scaring most of the cows in the neighbourhood, I pulled up in a farmer’s back yard.”

“Have you flown far?” a farmhand asked. “From America,” she replied.

Earhart returned home to a ticker tape parade in New York. Congress awarded her the first Distinguished Flying Cross to be given to a woman.

Back in Britain, praising her achievement while perhaps also revealing the prejudice she had to overcome, the Manchester Guardian reported: “She has succeeded in proving that the flight is not beyond the knowledge and the capacity for sustained endurance which a woman can acquire.”

Earhart herself felt she had proved that men and women were equal in “jobs requiring intelligence, coordination, speed, coolness, and willpower”.

By that time, she had already become the founder president of the Ninety-Nines, a group of 99 women out of 285 licensed female pilots in the US who came together to provide mutual support and encouragement.

The group still exists today, as an international organisation representing women flyers from 44 countries.

In 1935 Earhart became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific from Honolulu to Oakland, California. The time, for sustenance on the 2,408-mile flight, she took a thermos of hot chocolate.

The next year an Amelia Earhart Fund for Aeronautical Research was created, which would raise the $80,000 needed to buy the Lockheed Electra 10E two-motor all-metal monoplane that was going to take her and Noonan around the world.

The money was raised with the help of Purdue University, Indiana, and writing about her “world circling project” Earhart allowed herself a “considerable digression” – one that revealed her as a pioneer of more than just aviation.

Purdue, she wrote, was “a forward-looking institution” and not just because it was one of the few universities in the world to have its own landing field.

“It is co-educational,” wrote Earhart.  “Of its 6,000 students approximately 1,000 are women. The problems and opportunities of these girls were quite as much my concern as aviation matters.

“Perhaps I have something of a chip on my shoulder when it comes to modern feminine education … I have known girls who should be tinkering with mechanical things instead of making dresses.”

Earhart allowed herself to dream of young women learning in a “catch-as-can machine-shop, where girls may tinker to their heart’s content with motors, lathes, jigsaws … Peering up into the innards of engines, and likely as not get oil in their hair.”

“One of my favourite phobias,” she wrote, “Is that girls, especially those whose tastes aren’t routine, often don’t get a fair break. The situation is not new. It has come down through the generations, an inheritance of age-old customs, which produced the corollary that women are bred to timidity.”

Those words were published posthumously, in Last Flight, a collection of diary entries and notes gathered together by her husband, who, as she hoped he would, had never tried to keep her in an “attractive cage”.

Noonan and Earhart had just 7,000 miles left of their 29,000-mile circumnavigation when they took off from Lae, New Guinea, on 2 July 1937.

They were heading for Howland Island, 2,556 miles away, where after a flight of at least 18 hours, the US Coast Guard cutter Itasca would be waiting with fuel.

Two other ships were positioned along the expected flight route, with orders to turn on every one of their lights, to act as markers.

“Howland is such a small spot in the Pacific that every aid to locating it must be available,” Earhart had insisted.

Hoping to arrive at around dawn, they took off with the forecast predicting fair weather. Instead they encountered cloud, which made it hard for Noonan to use his preferred technique of navigating by the stars.

At 7:42am the crew of the Itasca picked up a radio message from Earhart: “We must be on you, but we cannot see you. Fuel is running low. Been unable to reach you by radio. We are flying at 1,000 feet.”

The ship tried to reply. Earhart and Noonan seemed not to hear.

At 8.43am, Earhart radioed the ship: “We are running north and south.”

Then she and Noonan were heard no more.

As she had told her husband, Amelia Earhart knew the risks, but she was damned if she was going to give in to what some might have sought to characterise as feminine “timidity”.

She had effectively made a record of her attitude before her first transatlantic expedition in 1928, when she left what she called “popping off” letters, in case she never returned.

“Dearest Dad,” read the “popping off” letter to her father. “Hooray for the last grand adventure! I wish I had won, but it was worthwhile anyway.”

Nine years later, the grand adventure finally claimed her, but by then it could never destroy her legacy.

Her bleached bones may have ended up on Nikumaroro, but Amelia Earhart survives in the memory of her deeds, and in words which even now have the power to inspire anyone, of whatever gender.

With the riddle of her last flight now seemingly solved, attention may focus on how the pioneer pilot defied ‘the inheritance of age-old customs that women are bred to timidity’

In 1960 an old US coastguard told a curious reporter a tale he had heard some 14 years before on the Pacific island of Nikumaroro.

Not long after the island was first settled in 1938, said Floyd Kilts, a local man was walking by the shore: “There in the brush about 5ft feet from the shoreline he saw a skeleton. What attracted him to it were the shoes. Women’s shoes, American kind…”

Was this, the old coastguard wondered, the key to what really happened to Amelia Earhart 

, the aviation pioneer who had disappeared in 1937 while attempting to become the first woman to fly around the world?
Even in 1960, the mystery was assuming mythical proportions.

Some were suggesting that Earhart had actually been on a secret spying mission for US President Franklin Roosevelt; that she had survived and returned to the US to live under a false identity. 

In time, there would be speculation that Earhart had been captured by the Japanese, sometimes with the embellishment that she had been forced to become the voice of “Tokyo Rose”, taunting US servicemen with propaganda broadcasts during the Second World War.

The official US government position remained that Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan had crashed into the Pacific Ocean and died at sea while trying to reach Howland Island.

Now Kilts was suggesting the pair had died as castaways on what had then been an uninhabited, waterless Pacific atoll some 350 miles from their intended destination.

She may have enjoyed being named by the Fashion Designers of America as one of the 10 best dressed women in the US in 1934, but from the start Earhart delighted in defying the expectations placed on young women.

As a child, she climbed trees, hunted rats with a .22 rifle and kept a scrapbook of newspaper cuttings about accomplished women.

She took a car mechanics course, and when aged 23, she was first taken up in a plane, as a passenger on a 10-minute air show joy ride in 1920: “As soon as I left the ground, I knew I myself had to fly.”

She paid for her flying lessons with jobs that included being a truck driver.

Shortly after completing her first solo flight in 1921, Earhart bought a second-hand Kinner Airster biplane, painted it bright yellow and nicknamed it “the Canary”.

The next year she flew the Canary up to 14,000 feet, the world altitude record at the time for female pilots. 

Then in 1923 she got her pilot’s licence from the Federation Aeronautique, the world governing body for aeronautics. She was the 16th woman in the world to have such a pilot’s licence.

It was during her spell as a social worker helping poor immigrants in a “settlement house” in Boston in 1928 that Earhart was asked if she wanted to join an expedition that would make her the first woman to fly across the Atlantic.

She leapt at the chance – even though, on the 20 hour, 40 minute flight from Newfoundland to Wales with Wilmer Stultz and Lou Gordon she was not herself able to take the controls of the Fokker FVII aeroplane.

The flight, however, gave her a first taste of international fame, and bought her into contact with the publicist George P. Putnam, (GPP), who became her manager and – eventually – her husband. He proposed six times before she said yes.

And on the morning of 7 February 1931, their wedding day, she sent him a letter.

“Dear GPP,” she told him, “There are some things which should be writ before we are married.

“You must know again my reluctance to marry, my feeling that I shatter thereby chances in work which means most to me.

“Please let us not interfere with the others’ work or play … I cannot guarantee to endure at all times the confinements of even an attractive cage.”

Fifteen months after her wedding, On 21 May 1932, she became the first woman to complete a solo, non-stop flight across the Atlantic.

Four hours into her 2,026-mile flight, Earhart revealed, “I saw flames shooting from the exhaust pipe.”

“I became uneasy,” she admitted.  “It would have taken four hours to return, however, so I thought it would be safer to go ahead.”

Then she realised the fuel tank of her Lockheed Vega 5B monoplane was leaking.

She flew on, with the exhaust manifold of her engine burned out and only tomato juice to keep her own energy levels up.

Fourteen hours and 56 minutes after leaving Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, she said, “After scaring most of the cows in the neighbourhood, I pulled up in a farmer’s back yard.”

“Have you flown far?” a farmhand asked. “From America,” she replied.

Earhart returned home to a ticker tape parade in New York. Congress awarded her the first Distinguished Flying Cross to be given to a woman.

Back in Britain, praising her achievement while perhaps also revealing the prejudice she had to overcome, the Manchester Guardian reported: “She has succeeded in proving that the flight is not beyond the knowledge and the capacity for sustained endurance which a woman can acquire.”

Earhart herself felt she had proved that men and women were equal in “jobs requiring intelligence, coordination, speed, coolness, and willpower”.

By that time, she had already become the founder president of the Ninety-Nines, a group of 99 women out of 285 licensed female pilots in the US who came together to provide mutual support and encouragement.

The group still exists today, as an international organisation representing women flyers from 44 countries.

In 1935 Earhart became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific from Honolulu to Oakland, California. The time, for sustenance on the 2,408-mile flight, she took a thermos of hot chocolate.

The next year an Amelia Earhart Fund for Aeronautical Research was created, which would raise the $80,000 needed to buy the Lockheed Electra 10E two-motor all-metal monoplane that was going to take her and Noonan around the world.

The money was raised with the help of Purdue University, Indiana, and writing about her “world circling project” Earhart allowed herself a “considerable digression” – one that revealed her as a pioneer of more than just aviation.

Purdue, she wrote, was “a forward-looking institution” and not just because it was one of the few universities in the world to have its own landing field.

“It is co-educational,” wrote Earhart.  “Of its 6,000 students approximately 1,000 are women. The problems and opportunities of these girls were quite as much my concern as aviation matters.

“Perhaps I have something of a chip on my shoulder when it comes to modern feminine education … I have known girls who should be tinkering with mechanical things instead of making dresses.”

Earhart allowed herself to dream of young women learning in a “catch-as-can machine-shop, where girls may tinker to their heart’s content with motors, lathes, jigsaws … Peering up into the innards of engines, and likely as not get oil in their hair.”

“One of my favourite phobias,” she wrote, “Is that girls, especially those whose tastes aren’t routine, often don’t get a fair break. The situation is not new. It has come down through the generations, an inheritance of age-old customs, which produced the corollary that women are bred to timidity.”

Those words were published posthumously, in Last Flight, a collection of diary entries and notes gathered together by her husband, who, as she hoped he would, had never tried to keep her in an “attractive cage”.

Noonan and Earhart had just 7,000 miles left of their 29,000-mile circumnavigation when they took off from Lae, New Guinea, on 2 July 1937.

They were heading for Howland Island, 2,556 miles away, where after a flight of at least 18 hours, the US Coast Guard cutter Itasca would be waiting with fuel.

Two other ships were positioned along the expected flight route, with orders to turn on every one of their lights, to act as markers.

“Howland is such a small spot in the Pacific that every aid to locating it must be available,” Earhart had insisted.

Hoping to arrive at around dawn, they took off with the forecast predicting fair weather. Instead they encountered cloud, which made it hard for Noonan to use his preferred technique of navigating by the stars.

At 7:42am the crew of the Itasca picked up a radio message from Earhart: “We must be on you, but we cannot see you. Fuel is running low. Been unable to reach you by radio. We are flying at 1,000 feet.”

The ship tried to reply. Earhart and Noonan seemed not to hear.

At 8.43am, Earhart radioed the ship: “We are running north and south.”

Then she and Noonan were heard no more.

As she had told her husband, Amelia Earhart knew the risks, but she was damned if she was going to give in to what some might have sought to characterise as feminine “timidity”.

She had effectively made a record of her attitude before her first transatlantic expedition in 1928, when she left what she called “popping off” letters, in case she never returned.

“Dearest Dad,” read the “popping off” letter to her father. “Hooray for the last grand adventure! I wish I had won, but it was worthwhile anyway.”

Nine years later, the grand adventure finally claimed her, but by then it could never destroy her legacy.

Her bleached bones may have ended up on Nikumaroro, but Amelia Earhart survives in the memory of her deeds, and in words which even now have the power to inspire anyone, of whatever gender.

Pilot Training with OMNI Airline Training Academy is Worth It

OMNI Airline Training Academy is located in Clark Freeport Zone. For 25 years, the premier flying school stood the test of time. Given its experience in the aviation industry, what makes the Academy the right flying school for you?

For starters, the OMNI Airline Training Academy is the fourth best flight school in the Philippines. Owlcation.com names it as such, making it the best flying school in Central Luzon. Its location makes it an appropriate training ground for aspiring pilots.

They say if you want to be the best, be WITH the best. The OMNI Airline Training Academy stands out among other flight schools due to its experience in honing individuals to be airline-ready after enrolling and undergoing the courses in its Pilot Training Program.

The Academy provides a rigorous training for soon-to-be pilots to make sure they will withstand all the challenges, pass all the exams, and acquire all the requirements necessary in being a pilot in any airline.

The premier flying school also has its own set of skilled, professional, and experienced instructors that stayed loyal and true to OMNI’s goal, which is to train the best pilot in the airline industry.

The OMNI Airline Training Academy can help you achieve your goal. The Academy is set on making pilots with excellent skills and knowledge. Its Pilot Training Program also offers the highest standards of excellence in flight training.

The flying school’s program also instills the importance of safety and professionalism amongst its cadets to make sure that they are flying with confidence and excellence once they become part of the fleet of the aviation industry in the Philippines.

The OMNI Airline Training Academy will help you throughout the entire process with proper guidance. Dreaming of becoming an airline pilot? Join the premier flying school today.

Contact the OMNI Airline Training Academy to find out more about its program.

OMNI Airline Training Academy is located in Clark Freeport Zone. For 25 years, the premier flying school stood the test of time. Given its experience in the aviation industry, what makes the Academy the right flying school for you?

For starters, the OMNI Airline Training Academy is the fourth best flight school in the Philippines. Owlcation.com names it as such, making it the best flying school in Central Luzon. Its location makes it an appropriate training ground for aspiring pilots.

They say if you want to be the best, be WITH the best. The OMNI Airline Training Academy stands out among other flight schools due to its experience in honing individuals to be airline-ready after enrolling and undergoing the courses in its Pilot Training Program.

The Academy provides a rigorous training for soon-to-be pilots to make sure they will withstand all the challenges, pass all the exams, and acquire all the requirements necessary in being a pilot in any airline.

The premier flying school also has its own set of skilled, professional, and experienced instructors that stayed loyal and true to OMNI’s goal, which is to train the best pilot in the airline industry.

The OMNI Airline Training Academy can help you achieve your goal. The Academy is set on making pilots with excellent skills and knowledge. Its Pilot Training Program also offers the highest standards of excellence in flight training.

The flying school’s program also instills the importance of safety and professionalism amongst its cadets to make sure that they are flying with confidence and excellence once they become part of the fleet of the aviation industry in the Philippines.

The OMNI Airline Training Academy will help you throughout the entire process with proper guidance. Dreaming of becoming an airline pilot? Join the premier flying school today.

Contact the OMNI Airline Training Academy to find out more about its program.

PH, SoKor aviation experiences rapid growth brought by tourism

South Korea has risen as the largest source market for the Philippine tourism industry. It has also emerged as the largest international market from the country. South Korea has also helped drive rapid growth in visitor growth, as well as in international traffic from the Philippines.

Over the past eight years, South Korean visitors have tripled. Every year, over 1.6 million South Koreans go to the Philippines for a visit.
There are now five Philippine airports connected with South Korea. Metro Manila and Cebu are dominating the market. The Cebu-South Korea route has rapidly grown in particular, as it now accounts for 60 percent of the total international traffic at the Philippines’ second largest airport.

The seat capacity for Philippines-South Korea market is also seeing some growth. There are now around 50,000 one-way seats from the country to South Korea every week. The figures make up for approximately 15 percent of the total international seat capacity from the Philippines.

In general, the seating capacity for the route has almost double over the past seven years. Imagine, there were only about 28,000 one-way weekly seats in September 2011.

The aviation industry now sees the Philippine-South Korea as a highly seasonal market. The peak travel in this route is late December to March. During the peak season last winter, the seating capacity for this market went beyond 60,000 weekly seats when in 2011-2012; the capacity peaked at an average of 35,000 weekly one-way seats.

The market may keep growing because the Philippines is a popular destination for Korean travelers. Filipinos also opt to travel to South Korea more and more now, seeing as it is the fifth largest international market from South Korea, after Japan, China, Vietnam, and the US.

OMNI Airline Training Academy trains pilots and flight attendants to contribute to the growing aviation industry in the two countries. Contact us today for more information about our services.

South Korea has risen as the largest source market for the Philippine tourism industry. It has also emerged as the largest international market from the country. South Korea has also helped drive rapid growth in visitor growth, as well as in international traffic from the Philippines.

Over the past eight years, South Korean visitors have tripled. Every year, over 1.6 million South Koreans go to the Philippines for a visit.
There are now five Philippine airports connected with South Korea. Metro Manila and Cebu are dominating the market. The Cebu-South Korea route has rapidly grown in particular, as it now accounts for 60 percent of the total international traffic at the Philippines’ second largest airport.

The seat capacity for Philippines-South Korea market is also seeing some growth. There are now around 50,000 one-way seats from the country to South Korea every week. The figures make up for approximately 15 percent of the total international seat capacity from the Philippines.

In general, the seating capacity for the route has almost double over the past seven years. Imagine, there were only about 28,000 one-way weekly seats in September 2011.

The aviation industry now sees the Philippine-South Korea as a highly seasonal market. The peak travel in this route is late December to March. During the peak season last winter, the seating capacity for this market went beyond 60,000 weekly seats when in 2011-2012; the capacity peaked at an average of 35,000 weekly one-way seats.

The market may keep growing because the Philippines is a popular destination for Korean travelers. Filipinos also opt to travel to South Korea more and more now, seeing as it is the fifth largest international market from South Korea, after Japan, China, Vietnam, and the US.

OMNI Airline Training Academy trains pilots and flight attendants to contribute to the growing aviation industry in the two countries. Contact us today for more information about our services.

Palawan’s El Nido under rehabilitation

No total shutdown; 22 establishments closed

After Boracay, the government has launched a rehabilitation program for another top tourist destination, the resort town of El Nido in Palawan.

The rehabilitation starts with the shutdown of 22 tourism-oriented establishments found violating various environmental laws, including being built too close to the sea, Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo-Puyat said yesterday.

Unlike in Boracay, however, there will be no total shutdown of El Nido, where several of the high-end resorts of Palawan are located.

The Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) urged the government to study carefully the proposal to close tourist spots in El Nido and Coron in Palawan for rehabilitation.

Puyat told a press conference in Quezon City that although a total closure of El Nido may not be necessary, the government is looking at the possibility of imposing limits on the number of tourists to be allowed in the resort town.

“The local government in El Nido, Palawan said they closed 22 establishments,” Puyat said.

Local officials of El Nido met yesterday with Puyat, Natural Resources Secretary Roy Cimatu and Secretary Eduardo Año of the Department of the Interior and Local Government at the DILG office in Quezon City. 

Their three departments were tasked to rehabilitate Boracay when it was closed to tourists at the height of the travel season this year. 

Boracay was shut down in April and reopened on Oct. 26.

Puyat said the Palawan Interagency Task Force composed of DOT, DENR and DILG is set to conduct rehabilitation efforts for El Nido to prevent the looming pollution problem from getting worse.

Yesterday, the task force started its consultation with stakeholders and the local government of El Nido to chart the course of action in rehabilitating the town.

Año said what will be discussed or agreed upon in the series of meetings with the local government, environmental organizations and others will be the basis of the recommendation that the Palawan Task Force will submit to President Duterte.

The President had previously ordered the six-month total closure of Boracay in Aklan province, to give way to rehabilitation following massive water pollution and waste disposal problems.

Año said the overcrowding situation in El Nido is not as massive as it was in Boracay, thus the total closure of the town to tourists while undergoing rehabilitation may not be necessary. 

“With the help of the local government units, we can also come up with a security task force to guard El Nido. It has 45 islands and we must secure all of those if we want to preserve El Nido as a top tourist destination,” he added.

For his part, Environment Secretary Cimatu said he had already ordered an increased presence of DENR personnel in El Nido and the nearby municipality of Coron, to ensure environmental compliance of business establishments operating at the two tourists destinations.

“We have to be very strict in El Nido and Coron. We will dedicate a big portion of the DENR presence there to focus on environmental compliance,” Cimatu said.

Cimatu said ensuring the environmental compliance of the business establishments, particularly when it comes to the disposal of their solid and water wastes, is among the aspects of Task Force Palawan’s rehabilitation program.

“We are still finalizing the timeline for the rehabilitation program, but there will be three aspects. The environmental compliance aspect, the DILG aspect which involves the issue of business permits and building constructions, and the tourism side,” Cimatu said.

As far as the meeting is concerned, Puyat said she is pushing local government officials to create a local ordinance that would limit the number of boats entering the lagoon. 

Puyat said the officials have promised to implement the ordinance by December this year. 

Dialogue for rehab

PCCI said the government should hold a dialogue with key stakeholders to map out rehabilitation plans before considering the closure of resorts.

In addition, the PCCI said concerned local government units should take a more proactive role in identifying and cleaning up their respective illegal waste disposal and sewer problems instead of waiting for the national government to come in and intervene.

“Closing El Nido and Coron will not be good for business, particularly for the legitimate industry stakeholders who will suffer the most from cancellation of bookings and reservations for the coming months,” PCCI said.

It added the move would affect the local communities and many jobs.

Instead, the group said the government should shut down or impose heavy fines only on establishments that are proven to have committed violations of environmental codes.

PCCI also said erring officials should be charged or removed from office.

About a million tourists visit Palawan every year, with the bulk going to El Nido and Coron.

Tourist arrivals in El Nido in particular reached 200,000 last year.

Given the six-month closure of Boracay island for rehabilitation, tourist arrivals in El Nido are expected to be higher this year.

No weapons

Meanwhile, Malacañang yesterday defended Duterte’s decision to bar other countries from stockpiling weapons in Palawan, saying it would protect the province from being a “flaming collateral damage” in case conflict escalates in the South China Sea. 

Last week, Duterte said he would not allow other countries to store firearms or ammunition in Palawan, the western Philippine province nearest to the disputed areas in the South China Sea. 

Duterte, who has been accused of being soft on China on the maritime row, has said there is a “great risk” that Palawan might be caught in the crossfire between feuding parties in the area. He has also stressed that the Philippines is not ready for a war over the disputed areas.

Reacting to Duterte’s pronouncement, American analyst Anders Corr said the restriction would leave Palawan militarily vulnerable to China’s advantage.

But presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo maintained that Duterte’s decision reflects the Philippine leader’s “acumen and diplomacy in dealing with the issue.”

“The President has embarked on a cautious, pragmatic, diplomatic yet independent stand on how to deal with the favorable arbitral ruling. The President has a wealth of information at his disposal, which is not readily available to ordinary citizens or foreigners, hence he is in the best position to decide on international matters that affect the welfare of the nation,” Panelo said. 

No total shutdown; 22 establishments closed

After Boracay, the government has launched a rehabilitation program for another top tourist destination, the resort town of El Nido in Palawan.

The rehabilitation starts with the shutdown of 22 tourism-oriented establishments found violating various environmental laws, including being built too close to the sea, Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo-Puyat said yesterday.

Unlike in Boracay, however, there will be no total shutdown of El Nido, where several of the high-end resorts of Palawan are located.

The Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) urged the government to study carefully the proposal to close tourist spots in El Nido and Coron in Palawan for rehabilitation.

Puyat told a press conference in Quezon City that although a total closure of El Nido may not be necessary, the government is looking at the possibility of imposing limits on the number of tourists to be allowed in the resort town.

“The local government in El Nido, Palawan said they closed 22 establishments,” Puyat said.

Local officials of El Nido met yesterday with Puyat, Natural Resources Secretary Roy Cimatu and Secretary Eduardo Año of the Department of the Interior and Local Government at the DILG office in Quezon City. 

Their three departments were tasked to rehabilitate Boracay when it was closed to tourists at the height of the travel season this year. 

Boracay was shut down in April and reopened on Oct. 26.

Puyat said the Palawan Interagency Task Force composed of DOT, DENR and DILG is set to conduct rehabilitation efforts for El Nido to prevent the looming pollution problem from getting worse.

Yesterday, the task force started its consultation with stakeholders and the local government of El Nido to chart the course of action in rehabilitating the town.

Año said what will be discussed or agreed upon in the series of meetings with the local government, environmental organizations and others will be the basis of the recommendation that the Palawan Task Force will submit to President Duterte.

The President had previously ordered the six-month total closure of Boracay in Aklan province, to give way to rehabilitation following massive water pollution and waste disposal problems.

Año said the overcrowding situation in El Nido is not as massive as it was in Boracay, thus the total closure of the town to tourists while undergoing rehabilitation may not be necessary. 

“With the help of the local government units, we can also come up with a security task force to guard El Nido. It has 45 islands and we must secure all of those if we want to preserve El Nido as a top tourist destination,” he added.

For his part, Environment Secretary Cimatu said he had already ordered an increased presence of DENR personnel in El Nido and the nearby municipality of Coron, to ensure environmental compliance of business establishments operating at the two tourists destinations.

“We have to be very strict in El Nido and Coron. We will dedicate a big portion of the DENR presence there to focus on environmental compliance,” Cimatu said.

Cimatu said ensuring the environmental compliance of the business establishments, particularly when it comes to the disposal of their solid and water wastes, is among the aspects of Task Force Palawan’s rehabilitation program.

“We are still finalizing the timeline for the rehabilitation program, but there will be three aspects. The environmental compliance aspect, the DILG aspect which involves the issue of business permits and building constructions, and the tourism side,” Cimatu said.

As far as the meeting is concerned, Puyat said she is pushing local government officials to create a local ordinance that would limit the number of boats entering the lagoon. 

Puyat said the officials have promised to implement the ordinance by December this year. 

Dialogue for rehab

PCCI said the government should hold a dialogue with key stakeholders to map out rehabilitation plans before considering the closure of resorts.

In addition, the PCCI said concerned local government units should take a more proactive role in identifying and cleaning up their respective illegal waste disposal and sewer problems instead of waiting for the national government to come in and intervene.

“Closing El Nido and Coron will not be good for business, particularly for the legitimate industry stakeholders who will suffer the most from cancellation of bookings and reservations for the coming months,” PCCI said.

It added the move would affect the local communities and many jobs.

Instead, the group said the government should shut down or impose heavy fines only on establishments that are proven to have committed violations of environmental codes.

PCCI also said erring officials should be charged or removed from office.

About a million tourists visit Palawan every year, with the bulk going to El Nido and Coron.

Tourist arrivals in El Nido in particular reached 200,000 last year.

Given the six-month closure of Boracay island for rehabilitation, tourist arrivals in El Nido are expected to be higher this year.

No weapons

Meanwhile, Malacañang yesterday defended Duterte’s decision to bar other countries from stockpiling weapons in Palawan, saying it would protect the province from being a “flaming collateral damage” in case conflict escalates in the South China Sea. 

Last week, Duterte said he would not allow other countries to store firearms or ammunition in Palawan, the western Philippine province nearest to the disputed areas in the South China Sea. 

Duterte, who has been accused of being soft on China on the maritime row, has said there is a “great risk” that Palawan might be caught in the crossfire between feuding parties in the area. He has also stressed that the Philippines is not ready for a war over the disputed areas.

Reacting to Duterte’s pronouncement, American analyst Anders Corr said the restriction would leave Palawan militarily vulnerable to China’s advantage.

But presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo maintained that Duterte’s decision reflects the Philippine leader’s “acumen and diplomacy in dealing with the issue.”

“The President has embarked on a cautious, pragmatic, diplomatic yet independent stand on how to deal with the favorable arbitral ruling. The President has a wealth of information at his disposal, which is not readily available to ordinary citizens or foreigners, hence he is in the best position to decide on international matters that affect the welfare of the nation,” Panelo said. 

PAL offers Clark to San Vicente, Palawan flights for as low as P819

The opening of San Vicente, Palawan routes has led to the Philippine Airlines (PAL) to offer flights for as low as eight hundred nineteen pesos (P819). The airline launched three new routes out of Clark, one of which flies to the growing tourist town of San Vicente.

The aviation and tourism industries see San Vicente, Palawan as the next Boracay, which is why PAL expects the demand for flights to the destination to pick up quickly. The route will allow travelers to bypass Puerto Princesa en route to the resort town of El Nido.

The Philippine Airlines will increase the flight frequencies of the Clark-San Vicente route to a daily flight on the 18th of December. The airline will offer seats at a promotional rate of P819 one way, beginning on the 28th of October.

PAL will also launch a new route, from Clark International Airport to San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. Another additional route is from Clark to Cauayan, Isabela. Both new routes will start on the 30th of October. The Philippine Airlines offers flights to the said destinations starting at five hundred nineteen pesos (P519).

The airline is also set to boost the frequencies of flights between Clark and Bacolod, Basco, Busuanga, Cagayan De Oro, Catarman, Cauayan, Cebu, Puerto Princesa, and Siargao.

Flying out of Clark makes more sense for travelers on a budget because the fares out of Clark International Airport are about 40 percent lower than the fares out of Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA).

The opening of San Vicente, Palawan routes has led to the Philippine Airlines (PAL) to offer flights for as low as eight hundred nineteen pesos (P819). The airline launched three new routes out of Clark, one of which flies to the growing tourist town of San Vicente.

The aviation and tourism industries see San Vicente, Palawan as the next Boracay, which is why PAL expects the demand for flights to the destination to pick up quickly. The route will allow travelers to bypass Puerto Princesa en route to the resort town of El Nido.

The Philippine Airlines will increase the flight frequencies of the Clark-San Vicente route to a daily flight on the 18th of December. The airline will offer seats at a promotional rate of P819 one way, beginning on the 28th of October.

PAL will also launch a new route, from Clark International Airport to San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. Another additional route is from Clark to Cauayan, Isabela. Both new routes will start on the 30th of October. The Philippine Airlines offers flights to the said destinations starting at five hundred nineteen pesos (P519).

The airline is also set to boost the frequencies of flights between Clark and Bacolod, Basco, Busuanga, Cagayan De Oro, Catarman, Cauayan, Cebu, Puerto Princesa, and Siargao.

Flying out of Clark makes more sense for travelers on a budget because the fares out of Clark International Airport are about 40 percent lower than the fares out of Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA).

NAIA vs MIA: Warfare between Names

The opening of San Vicente, Palawan routes has led to the Philippine Airlines (PAL) to offer flights for as low as eight hundred nineteen pesos (P819). The airline launched three new routes out of Clark, one of which flies to the growing tourist town of San Vicente.

The aviation and tourism industries see San Vicente, Palawan as the next Boracay, which is why PAL expects the demand for flights to the destination to pick up quickly. The route will allow travelers to bypass Puerto Princesa en route to the resort town of El Nido.

The Philippine Airlines will increase the flight frequencies of the Clark-San Vicente route to a daily flight on the 18th of December. The airline will offer seats at a promotional rate of P819 one way, beginning on the 28th of October.

PAL will also launch a new route, from Clark International Airport to San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. Another additional route is from Clark to Cauayan, Isabela. Both new routes will start on the 30th of October. The Philippine Airlines offers flights to the said destinations starting at five hundred nineteen pesos (P519).

The airline is also set to boost the frequencies of flights between Clark and Bacolod, Basco, Busuanga, Cagayan De Oro, Catarman, Cauayan, Cebu, Puerto Princesa, and Siargao.

Flying out of Clark makes more sense for travelers on a budget because the fares out of Clark International Airport are about 40 percent lower than the fares out of Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA).

The opening of San Vicente, Palawan routes has led to the Philippine Airlines (PAL) to offer flights for as low as eight hundred nineteen pesos (P819). The airline launched three new routes out of Clark, one of which flies to the growing tourist town of San Vicente.

The aviation and tourism industries see San Vicente, Palawan as the next Boracay, which is why PAL expects the demand for flights to the destination to pick up quickly. The route will allow travelers to bypass Puerto Princesa en route to the resort town of El Nido.

The Philippine Airlines will increase the flight frequencies of the Clark-San Vicente route to a daily flight on the 18th of December. The airline will offer seats at a promotional rate of P819 one way, beginning on the 28th of October.

PAL will also launch a new route, from Clark International Airport to San Jose, Occidental Mindoro. Another additional route is from Clark to Cauayan, Isabela. Both new routes will start on the 30th of October. The Philippine Airlines offers flights to the said destinations starting at five hundred nineteen pesos (P519).

The airline is also set to boost the frequencies of flights between Clark and Bacolod, Basco, Busuanga, Cagayan De Oro, Catarman, Cauayan, Cebu, Puerto Princesa, and Siargao.

Flying out of Clark makes more sense for travelers on a budget because the fares out of Clark International Airport are about 40 percent lower than the fares out of Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA).

More Women enter the Aviation Industry; Global figures still far too low

There are about 4.5 commercial female pilots in the UK. Up to now, women still get frowned upon when they enter the male-dominated profession.

But truth be told, women have entered the aviation industries across the world ever since air travel started. Most of the jobs of women in the industry, however, were non-flying roles. These include the likes of flight simulation training, flight attendants, and air traffic control.

Over the years, the number of female pilots has increased significantly. The problem, however, is that the numbers are still too low. This is due to the fact that there’s a genuinely unfair pay misalignment.

India has about 11.6 percent of female commercial airline pilots. But the numbers only leave a three percent mark across the globe.

Being a woman in the industry, female pilots are left with no choice but to put their femininity aside. As of now, it’s the only way they see to succeed. There was not particular requirement to do it, but fitting in requires other pilots to acknowledge women without being tagged as “the girl.”

Times are changing, indeed, but a lot of work still needs to be done in the aviation industry. More work is needed to provide more opportunities for women.

One way to make it easier and more appealing for women to take pilot careers is for airlines to allow and offer more flexibility. Dealing with the challenges of having a work-life balance is something that the aviation industry may need to work on.

The gender inequality in the field is still a progress at work, but most female pilots are still open and positive about the rapid changes to take place in the workplace soon.

Inequalities are problematic for women, in almost all industries. Others have become more progressive than in the past centuries, but the aviation industry still needs a lot of changes. After all, women deserve the power and influence not just in the aviation industry, but in all aspects of life.

There are about 4.5 commercial female pilots in the UK. Up to now, women still get frowned upon when they enter the male-dominated profession.

But truth be told, women have entered the aviation industries across the world ever since air travel started. Most of the jobs of women in the industry, however, were non-flying roles. These include the likes of flight simulation training, flight attendants, and air traffic control.

Over the years, the number of female pilots has increased significantly. The problem, however, is that the numbers are still too low. This is due to the fact that there’s a genuinely unfair pay misalignment.

India has about 11.6 percent of female commercial airline pilots. But the numbers only leave a three percent mark across the globe.

Being a woman in the industry, female pilots are left with no choice but to put their femininity aside. As of now, it’s the only way they see to succeed. There was not particular requirement to do it, but fitting in requires other pilots to acknowledge women without being tagged as “the girl.”

Times are changing, indeed, but a lot of work still needs to be done in the aviation industry. More work is needed to provide more opportunities for women.

One way to make it easier and more appealing for women to take pilot careers is for airlines to allow and offer more flexibility. Dealing with the challenges of having a work-life balance is something that the aviation industry may need to work on.

The gender inequality in the field is still a progress at work, but most female pilots are still open and positive about the rapid changes to take place in the workplace soon.

Inequalities are problematic for women, in almost all industries. Others have become more progressive than in the past centuries, but the aviation industry still needs a lot of changes. After all, women deserve the power and influence not just in the aviation industry, but in all aspects of life.

Getting to Know Cebu Pacific’s first A321 Neo Aircraft

Airbus delivered its A321Neo to Cebu Pacific. The airline deployed the said aircraft for international routes end of 2018. It is an exciting adventure for budget carrier Cebu Pacific, with the neo deliveries. 

The Gokongwei-led airline, however, has yet to finalize which routes the A321neo will traverse. But at present, the airline is eyeing a combination of flights to Japan and Indonesia.

Currently, Cebu Pacific ordered five A320neo, two A321 ceo (current engine option), 32 Airbus A321neo, and six ATR 72-600 aircraft. The plane acquisitions will hopefully fuel the budget carrier’s growth. After all, Cebu Pacific has not expanded its fleet this much in the past few years.

Cebu Pacific will deploy the new fleet of aircraft in various airports across the country. These include Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), Clark International Airport (CRK), and Mactan-Cebu International Airport (MCIA).

There are many places in the country where the airline may set to deploy these aircraft. Cebu Pacific intends to stimulate the market while seeing if the airline can get enough traffic, seeing as there are enough places to put them.

Cebu Pacific may gradually phase out some of its older Airbus 320 units. Right now, the airline has a fleet of 67 planes, 36 of which are Airbus A320s, five A321ceos, eight A330s, eight ATR 72-500s, and ten ATR 72-600s.

OMNI Airline Training Academy has trained pilots and flight attendants that have entered Cebu Pacific. They are now one of the airline’s most esteemed employees in their fleet. Contact us today for more information.

Airbus delivered its A321Neo to Cebu Pacific. The airline deployed the said aircraft for international routes end of 2018. It is an exciting adventure for budget carrier Cebu Pacific, with the neo deliveries. 

The Gokongwei-led airline, however, has yet to finalize which routes the A321neo will traverse. But at present, the airline is eyeing a combination of flights to Japan and Indonesia.

Currently, Cebu Pacific ordered five A320neo, two A321 ceo (current engine option), 32 Airbus A321neo, and six ATR 72-600 aircraft. The plane acquisitions will hopefully fuel the budget carrier’s growth. After all, Cebu Pacific has not expanded its fleet this much in the past few years.

Cebu Pacific will deploy the new fleet of aircraft in various airports across the country. These include Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA), Clark International Airport (CRK), and Mactan-Cebu International Airport (MCIA).

There are many places in the country where the airline may set to deploy these aircraft. Cebu Pacific intends to stimulate the market while seeing if the airline can get enough traffic, seeing as there are enough places to put them.

Cebu Pacific may gradually phase out some of its older Airbus 320 units. Right now, the airline has a fleet of 67 planes, 36 of which are Airbus A320s, five A321ceos, eight A330s, eight ATR 72-500s, and ten ATR 72-600s.

OMNI Airline Training Academy has trained pilots and flight attendants that have entered Cebu Pacific. They are now one of the airline’s most esteemed employees in their fleet. Contact us today for more information.